Tag Archives: politics

July 2017

july2017coverIt’s July! Celebrate the summer and freedom with friends and family and some of our recommendations!

 

 

 

 

Michelle – Administration

whothoughtthiswasagoodideaWho thought this was a good idea? : and other questions you should have answers to when you work in the White House by Alyssa Mastromonaco, New Nonfiction 973.932 MAS

Mastromonaco, a former White House Deputy Chief of Staff during the Obama administration, wrote this funny and interesting look behind the scenes at the White House. She shares amusing, scary and downright embarrassing stories about her time in politics, starting as an intern for Bernie Sanders, working for the Kerry campaign and then joining Obama’s administration. What makes this book different from many other political books is that it is presented from the point of view of a woman in her 30s. Reading this book makes me yearn for the Obama years!

weinerdvdWeiner, DVD 328.73 Weiner

This documentary is an examination of disgraced New York Congressman Anthony Weiner’s 2013 mayoral campaign. It is a fascinating look at the inner workings of a man who threw away his career, had a very good chance for redemption and blew it – losing everything in the process. Watching this documentary, I went the whole spectrum of feeling sorry for him to wanting to smack him upside the head. I am still amazed that someone with so much potential could keep making the same mistake over and over again!

aunitedkingdomA United Kingdom, New DVD United Kingdom

This film is based on the true love story between the future King of Botswana and a white English woman in the 1940s. It stars David Oyelowo as Seretse, who is studying in London before taking his rightful place as King and Rosamund Pike as the woman he falls in love with and through their love, they change the course of African history. Their decision to marry just as apartheid is beginning in South Africa causes an international uproar. Before seeing this movie, I was completely unaware of this story and I think it is one that people need to be familiar with. It is a beautiful story of the triumph of love and an intriguing look at race relations from the perspectives of both the English and the Africans. Oyelowo gives another great performance as a man torn between his love for his wife and his love for his people.

Pat – Circulation

walkingwiththeenemyWalking with the Enemy starring Jonas Armstrong, Hannah Tointon, and Ben Kingsley, New DVD Walking with the Enemy

Set in 1944 in Hungary and inspired by true events, this powerful drama depicts the heroic efforts of Elek Cohen, whose real name was Pinchas Rosenbaum, and many others to try and save thousands of Jews from extermination in that country during WW2.

This movie serves as a brutal reminder of the horrific acts of the Nazis and others, but also illustrates the true bravery of the men and women who took actions and resisted their evil.

It’s no Schindler’s List but a little-known WW2 story that needed to be told.

Chris – Circulation

wolvesWolves by Rise Against, New CD 781.66 Rise Against

Chicago-native punk-rockers Rise Against remain amazingly consistent with their new album Wolves. This is the eighth studio album in their almost twenty years as a band, but they are as urgent as ever. Urgency is one of the themes of the album, especially in terms of speaking out and being active. They advocate that the best time is now to let your voice be heard so issues of injustice and global harm can be resolved and not persist to a point of irreversible damage. Their political, social, and environmental message is conveyed over the typical energy of punk compositions. The first four tracks are the standouts on the album: “Wolves,” “House on Fire,” The Violence,” and “Welcome to the Breakdown.” I’ll also note that there is a parental advisory on this album for some strong language in a few songs.

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June

junecoverpossibleIt’s June. What could be better than sitting by the pool or at the beach with a good book?

 

 

Sue – Circulation

whistlingpastgraveyardWhistling Past the Graveyard by Susan Crandall, New Fiction Crandall

I really enjoyed this coming-of-age story set in the early 1960s of the South and narrated by 9-year-old Starla. Starla’s mother left her and her father to be a star in Nashville when she was a toddler, so she has been raised mostly by her grandmother while her father is away working on an oil rig. Starla and her grandmother do not get along; Starla feels that the grandmother doesn’t love her as she is always punishing her. So Starla decides to run away to Nashville and find her mother. Along the road, Starla is picked up by a black woman named Eula traveling in a truck with a white baby. This is 1963 Mississippi, so that is not a usual site. However, Starla is an innocent child and so doesn’t fully understand the racial hatred of that time and place. Eula takes Starla to her home, where a confrontation with her violent husband sends her out on the road with Starla and the baby on the way to Tennessee. During the journey, Starla and Eula bond as they face experiences that test their courage and make them grow stronger. Starla learns some hard lessons about life both on the journey and when they reach Nashville. The relationship between Starla and Eula is portrayed beautifully and we really feel the love and devotion between the two.

firstimpressionsFirst Impressions: A Novel of Old Books, Unexpected Love, and Jane Austen by Charlie Lovett, New Fiction Lovett

Part historical fiction, part mystery, and part romance, this book alternates between the present day and the 1790s, telling the modern-day story of Sophie, a young woman just graduated from Oxford with a passion for English literature, especially the works of Jane Austen, and a 20-year-old Jane Austen herself in 1796 England. The part of the story involving Jane Austen revolves around her friendship with an elderly clergyman, Richard Mansfield, and the beginnings of her greatest novel, Pride and Prejudice. In the modern day story, Sophie gets a job in an antiquarian bookstore and receives two requests for an obscure book published in the late 1700s by an unknown clergyman. As Sophie investigates the requested book, she finds a link between it and Jane Austen that could rock the literary world, as well as endanger her own life. Being a book lover and book collector myself, I connected with the characters, especially Sophie’s Uncle Bertram, and I enjoyed the gentle relationship between Jane and Mr. Mansfield.

farmhandspiesFarmhand’s Favorite Pies: Recipes, Hints, and How-To’s from the Heartland by Amy and David Butler, 641.86 But

This book is invaluable for those who enjoy baking. I had never made my own pie crust before, but wanted to learn. I’d heard that using lard makes the best and flakiest crust, so I bought some organic lard and followed the recipe in this book for a super flaky crust. The book includes three recipes for crusts – two with butter, one with lard – as well as a crust for tarts and graham cracker and nut crusts. The book also includes tips and tricks for making the best crust and pies. In addition to the crust, I’ve also made the apple pie and it was a hit with my family. Recipes in the book include fruit pies, cream pies, tarts, and cobblers. The recipes come from blue ribbon-winning pies at county fairs throughout the U.S. Give the recipes a try – I’m sure you and your family will be pleased with the tasty results.

Jacob – Circulation

thunderboltkidThe Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid by Bill Bryson, 921 Bryson

Bill Bryson is an author typically known for his travel and science writing. This book, though, details his childhood in Des Moines, Iowa, in the 1950s. Nothing about his upbringing is particularly noteworthy, but what makes the book so entertaining is Bryson’s humorous storytelling ability. He takes mundane events and adds his own personal twist. Bryson also weaves into his lighthearted memoir the latest gadgets and gizmos available to the American family in the atomic age. Overall, the book is an easy read and a glimpse into what it was like growing up middle class in mid-America after WWII.

Mary – Youth Services

annieonmindAnnie on My Mind by Nancy Garden, YA Garden

Originally written in the early 1980’s, and often on the list of banned classics, Annie on My Mind tells the coming of age story of two girls, Eliza Winthrop and Annie Kenyon. They meet in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and since that meeting, they form a friendship, which transforms to a deep love for one another. At times, Annie on My Mind is a portrait of the times it was written in, but by extension, it is also an unfortunate portrait of intolerance still alive in modern society. You can heal or hurt because of your differences, and I think that Annie on My Mind provides a colorful cast of characters that will truly live beyond the time it was written for, as it already has. It is a book well worth checking out, and because of its frequently banned status, it is surely a story worth fighting to keep on library shelves.

1000formsfear1000 Forms of Fear by Sia, CD 781.63 Sia

There are very few songwriters as unique and explosive as Sia in modern music. Because of her distinct singing voice and iconic style of songwriting, the experience of listening to her sing is quite visceral. This album fully reflects the great emotional depth of her writing, and also her steely strength to battle pervasive anxieties, both personal and societal. 1000 Forms of Fear is a monumental achievement for Sia, and it leaves one imagining what she will do to top her latest work, as she always seems to do.

Hubbell – Circulation

poemsfromguanPoems from Guantanamo: The Detainees Speak, edited by Marc Falkoff, 892.7 Poems

Compiled by NIU College of Law professor Marc Falkoff, Poems from Guantánamo is eye-opening, inspiring, and heartbreaking. The collection features poems written by detainees themselves while incarcerated at Guantánamo Bay. The English translations are expertly done, annotated with linguistic details so that the native tone is not lost on the reader. Each poem is also prefaced with a brief summary of the inmate’s background and journey to the prison. One prisoner, detained at age 14, gives a harrowing account of his capture and transport to Cuba. Another, of British and Zambian heritage, wrote rap poetry to communicate with his family and friends back home. The stories portray a bleak existence of incarceration, but one that needs to be heard.

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