Tag Archives: Art

February

February2016It’s February! Let’s hope for an early spring and stay warm inside with a good book!

 

 

Sue – Circulation

goosecreekThe Most Famous Illegal Goose Creek Parade by Virginia Smith, New Fiction Smith

This is a charming book, the first title in a new series about Goose Creek, Kentucky, and its residents. The book centers around Al and Millie, a married couple with grown children. Al is near retirement and looks forward to peaceful days and some traveling. Millie, however, has other ideas and plays her husband of nearly 40 years just right to get her way. She wants to buy a dilapidated house in town and turn it into a bed and breakfast. Al is horrified by the idea and sees his retirement dreams going up in flames. Will he be able to put the kibosh on Millie’s plan or will he soon be a new business owner instead of a retiree? Meanwhile, the new veterinarian in town gets off on the wrong foot with one of the most outspoken residents of the town. Will she ever get a client or is she finished before she’s even begun? Then there is Norman, incensed that the mayor isn’t giving the job of painting the town’s water tower to his son, Little Norm, who did such a bad job the first time around that it needs to be repainted already. Norman launches an all-out campaign against the Town Council, dividing the residents into two sides. Funny and light with a warm heart, this is an enjoyable read and I look forward to more Goose Creek tales. The second book is called Renovating the Richardsons and it is being published on February 1, 2016.

thrushgreenAt Home in Thrush Green by Miss Read, Fiction Read

A title in the Thrush Green series by British author Miss Read that inspired Jan Karon’s Mitford series. This is a gentle read that follows the lives of a group of people living in a small village in the Cotswolds. The characters include Charles, the kind-hearted vicar, his gentle wife Dimity, Dimity’s brash best friend Ella, eccentric Dotty with her household of animals, Albert, the ill-tempered sexton, the maiden schoolteachers Miss Watson and Miss Fogerty, and others. The books are comforting and slow-paced and take you back to a simpler time and a simpler life. No violence, no bad language, no modern technology, just a group of people living out their lives in a small community. The series began in the 1950’s and continued until the 1990’s, but all the books in the series have an old-fashioned charm. This title chronicles a year of life in Thrush Green. New homes for elderly residents are being built in the village on the site of the former rectory that burned down the previous year. Some problems arise as the homes are built and once the residents move in, but in the end all is resolved and the village is peaceful once more. This is a sweet, charming series for those who enjoy gentle reads and reading about English country life and want an escape from the hectic and violent real world.

sitstayspeakSit! Stay! Speak! by Annie England Noblin, New Fiction Noblin

Addie inherits her late aunt’s house in the small town of Eunice, Arkansas, and moves there from Chicago. She plans on moving back to Chicago once she fixes up and sells the house, but is happy for a respite. Since losing her fiance in an accident two years ago, she doesn’t feel at home in Chicago anymore. But in Arkansas, Addie finds a whole new set of problems facing her. On her arrival in Eunice, Addie finds a pit bull terrier puppy who has been badly abused and left for dead. She adopts him and names him Felix. While nursing Felix back to health, Addie makes friends with the local vet tech and meets a man named Jasper, for whom she develops romantic feelings, but he sends her mixed signals. As Addie investigates what happened to Felix, she uncovers illegal activity going on in town and gets herself on the bad side of a dangerous man. It turns out life in Eunice isn’t so simple after all. Though it deals with serious issues, the book is a comfort read with charm, romance, and a happy ending for both Addie and Felix. The book also includes authentic Southern recipes, including hush puppies, cheese grits, and chocolate gravy.

Michelle – Administration

martian The Martian starring Matt Damon, New DVD Martian

Full disclosure – I did not read the book! However, this movie was even better than I anticipated. Matt Damon created a lovable character that the audience could really root for. He was very entertaining, even though he spent most of the movie without a co-star. The movie is able to maintain a high level of suspense throughout that will keep you on the edge of your seat.

Ant-Man starring Paul Rudd, New DVD Ant-Man (Blu Ray)antman

Not being familiar with the character before watching the movie, I couldn’t imagine a movie about a man turning into an ant being a good watch. I gave it the benefit of the doubt since Marvel has yet to let me down and they did it again. It is a great, funny movie with a lot of action. I will never look at ants the same way!

Dagmar – Circulation

fourseasonsinromeFour Season in Rome: On Twins, Insomnia, and the Biggest Funeral in the History of the World by Anthony Doerr, Nonfiction 914.5 Doe

Many readers are probably familiar with the talented and successful author Anthony Doerr. For his writings, Doerr has won numerous prizes and awards, including the Rome Prize, one of the most prestigious awards from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, which came with a stipend and a writing studio in Rome for a year. Doerr learned about the award on the day his wife Shauna and he came home from the hospital with their newborn twins. Doerr and his wife moved from Boise, Idaho, to Rome to spend a year at the American Academy when his twin boys, Henry and Owen, were only six months old. Doerr had planned to work on a new novel, which several years later became the highly acclaimed All the Light We Cannot See. In the process, however, he was enchanted by life in the Eternal City and wrote this delightful book as a result of his stay and experiences. He exquisitely describes his adventures in one of the most enchanting cities in the world – visits to piazzas and temples, and the vigil of a dying Pope John Paul II; but he also writes about the fun and frustration of living in a foreign country, about learning to negotiate everyday life in this “new” old world. He embraces these experiences, including the encounters with local grocers, bakers, and butchers of his neighborhood and makes them a part of his “Roman holiday.” This lovely, intimate book is a combination of a celebration of life in Rome, a fresh and wondrous look at new parenthood, and a fascinating look at creating the writer’s craft.

Hubbell – Circulation

lingoLingo: Around Europe in 60 Languages by Gaston Dorren, New Nonfiction 306.44 Dor

Despite the extensive linguistic study of most European languages, many details still remain under the surface. Dorren’s book takes a fun look at some of the lesser known European tongues. Each quick chapter focuses on a specific language or language family. Not too dense, the book lays out European linguistic diversity in an accessible manner and ties in the important historical causes of linguistic change.

bigshortThe Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine by Michael Lewis, Nonfiction 330.973 Lew

A hit movie in 2015, Michael Lewis’ The Big Short is the definitive insider’s look at the housing market crash that took place in the late 2000’s. It exposes just how few people it took to capsize the American economy. Lewis, a former investment banker himself, shows his unique insight into the greedy world of mortgage-backed securities trading.

boomerangBoomerang: Travels in the New Third World by Michael Lewis, Nonfiction 330.9 Lew

Written by the author of The Big Short and Blindside, Lewis’ book about global financial bubbles is hilarious and terrifying. He tells us why Italians and Greeks don’t pay their taxes and why everyday Icelandic fishermen became the country’s largest investing bloc. Then, after lambasting the international financial scene, Lewis brings the message home and shows us Americans are no better at preventing or forecasting these catastrophic events.

Mary – Youth Services

edwardgoreyEdward Gorey: His Book Cover Art & Design by Steven Heller, New Nonfiction 741.6 Hel

Born in Chicago, Illinois, Edward Gorey was an American illustrator. Best known for his gleefully macabre style, Gorey’s art embellished his own books, cartoons (the most famous being the opening sequence for the PBS Mystery! series), as well as hundreds of book covers for other writers. He illustrated covers which re-imagined the works of authors like Charles Dickens, Joseph Conrad, and Henry James. (On the subject of Henry James, Gorey famously said “I hate him more than anyone else…” Yet, he proceeded to do multiple covers of his work.) Edward Gorey: His Book Cover Art & Design is a collection of Gorey’s cover art, chronicling lesser-known covers he illustrated for other writers. Edward Gorey remains a singularity in the art field. Eclectic in personality and artistic style, this collection is a testament to the sheer volume and quality of his work, the likes of which we will perhaps never see again.

mrholmesMr. Holmes starring Ian McKellen, Laura Linney, and Milo Parker, New DVD Mr. Holmes

Based on the Holmes pastiche novel, A Slight Trick of the Mind, the film Mr. Holmes imagines the retirement years of the most famous fictional character of all times. Sherlock Holmes now lives in Sussex, with his housekeeper and her son. The narrative which follows is gorgeously shot, and has an intimate understanding of what it means to age, and the confusion and horror that accompanies irrevocable memory loss. Mr. Holmes, overall though, is a quiet film, but one that should not be overlooked. In the domestic scenes that take place in Sussex, all the way to Japan, this adaptation of Holmes gets right what most cannot: a look into the humanity of our favorite detective. Starring Ian McKellen, who, as always, is flawless.

madmaxMad Max: Fury Road starring Tom Hardy, Charlize Theron, and Nicholas Hoult, New DVD Mad Max

Having declared myself as not liking action films, I recently had to revoke my membership in the Please-Not-Another-Blow-Them-Up-Action-Flick Club. Mad Max: Fury Road is to blame. The post-apocalyptic world George Miller creates on-screen is a believably selfish; a world on the brink of ecological crisis. With water as a scarce resource, and women being exploited for their bodies, the leading regime is on the verge of collapse. Two individuals who escaped the dictatorship, Furiosa and Max, lead a crusade to free women and slaves. What follows is indescribably heart-pumping, dizzying action. Mad Max: Fury Road may be a glimpse at our own post-apocalyptic future, but it is one still filled with hope. Redemption ultimately rests in the hands of women, and they are not going down without a fight.

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June

Free Summer Royalty Free Stock Photos - 10036478

Finally warm weather is here. Take a book to the beach and enjoy!

Jacob – Circulation

booksMedium Raw: A Bloody Valentine to the World of Food and the People Who Cook by Anthony Bourdain, Adult Nonfiction 641.5 Bou

This book is a follow up to Anthony Bourdain’s Kitchen Confidential and once again Bourdain delights. He uses his sharp wit and new-found stardom to critique the most recent food trends and high profile chefs. When not critiquing, he shares stories that are humorous and insightful from his own experiences as a chef. This book is a quick read and quite entertaining.

Sue – Circulation

9545064The Story of Beautiful Girl by Rachel Simon, Fiction Simon

A beautiful, heart-rending story of a mentally disabled young woman and a deaf mute man, both of whom lived at a state-run institution in which the residents were mistreated. In 1968, the pair runs away from the institution and ends up on the doorstep of 70-year-old Martha, a lonely widow. The young woman, Lynnie, has just given birth to a daughter. That same night, the authorities come to Martha’s house and take Lynnie away. The man, Homan, manages to run away and the baby remains undetected. Lynnie asks Martha to keep the baby safe, and so begins a 40 year odyssey for Martha, the baby, Lynnie, and Homan. How their lives unfold over the decades makes for a compelling and absorbing read. The author’s sister is mentally disabled and though this story is fiction, Rachel Simon did research the history of such institutions as the one Lynnie and Homan were confined in, so the book’s portrayal of these institutions and the changes over the decades is historically accurate.

17834834Once We Were Brothers by Ronald H. Balson, New Fiction Balson

A compelling and deeply moving novel that combines elements of historical fiction with legal drama. It tells of the experiences of a Jewish family named Solomon in Poland during the Holocaust and the betrayal of that family by a German youth who was taken in and raised as a part of that family. The story opens in 2004 with 83-year-old Ben Solomon publicly accusing famous Chicago millionaire and philanthropist Elliot Rosenzweig of actually being an SS officer named Otto Piatek. Rosenzweig of course denies the accusation, but Ben is certain that Rosenzweig is actually Otto Piatek. He engages a lawyer named Catherine to bring a civil suit against Rosenzweig. In preparation for the lawsuit, Ben tells his story to Catherine over time so that the entire story of what happened to Ben and his family is told over the course of the novel. We learn that Otto was a 12-year-old boy with a German mother and Polish father who was left in the care of the Solomon family in the 1920s when the unemployed father could not care for him after the mother returned to Germany. So Otto and Ben grew up as brothers. The story of Otto’s transformation into a loyal Nazi and his betrayal of his foster family is chilling. The question of whether Rosenzweig is or is not Otto is revealed near the end of the novel. A powerful story about love and evil that will grip you until the final page.

 

FrenchLeaveFrench Leave by P.G. Wodehouse, New Fiction Wodehouse

This is a stand-alone Wodehouse novel written in the 1950s, not part of the Bertie-Jeeves, Blandings, or other Wodehouse well-known series, but just as funny as his better known novels. It is set primarily in the French Rivera and involves three sisters who run a chicken farm in Long Island and inherit some money. They decide to spend the money on an opulent vacation, where the two youngest sisters take turns pretending to be rich in order to find a wealthy man to marry. The daughter named Terry meets an elderly marquis, fallen on hard times and looking for a rich wife for his son, Jeff. Thinking Terry is rich, he wants to set them up. Being a Wodehouse novel, of course all kinds of humorous complications and misunderstandings ensue until all is worked out in the end.

Mary – Youth Services

17999159Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh, New YA Graphic Novel: BROSH

Based off the blog of the same title, “Hyperbole and a Half” recounts the hilarious, touching, and odd happenings in the life of self-proclaimed shut-in, Allie Brosh. Using childlike paint illustrations to describe her adult life, and childhood, Hyperbole and a Half humorously approaches topics such as the almighty love of cake, her dog’s bizarre behaviors, and most notably, her own struggle with depression. Don’t let the illustrations fool you. There is a great brevity, and wit, and pathos behind the wonderful scribbles of Allie Brosh.

11343Women in Art: Figures of Influence  by Reed Krakoff, New Adult Nonfiction 704. 042 Kra

Women in Art is a love-letter to modern women artists, art collectors, and curators. With large photographs, and wonderful interviews laced throughout, Women in Art is a physically beautiful book, well-designed; and a museum in and of itself. More importantly, however, this collection does not spread the giant misnomer: “Look, here are women! They do art, too!” But rather, Women in Art serves as a well-deserved collection of the personal portraits of women who are established and upcoming in the art world. The photographer who collected these women’s stories, and photographed their art, was reverent, and open-minded in the documentation of his subjects. This art book is a must-see for any person interested in entering, and impacting the art world. In short: brilliant.

Her2013PosterHer
, Starring: Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, Rooney Mara, and Scarlett Johansson, DVD Her
Taking place years in our immediate future, Her is the story of Theodore, an introverted man who works for a company whose main job is to write love-letters, or intimate messages for clients. This industry serves two types of people: 1). Individuals who would like intimacy in their lives, but do not have it. OR 2). Individuals who are too busy to send their loved ones personal, intimate messages, gifts, and gestures. Down on his luck and feeling lonely himself, Theodore purchases a computer operating system that uses artificial intelligence, which mirrors and develops just as a human being may. What Theodore does not foresee is the bond he forms with this artificially intelligent voice as she develops to learn about Theodore’s life, and emotionally support him. Her is such a funny, strange, and sometimes unsettling portrait of the way us human beings treat one another, and how we scar each other – especially those we are physically and emotionally intimate with – and how that effects our drive to isolate in a dawning age of technology.

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December!

The holidays are here and something something something cheer! I don’t know, I’m no Yuletide poet but I am proud to present these gifts of recommendations from the Oak Brook Library staff. Happy Holidays!

 
Mary – Reference
13067005“Talking to the Dead” – by: Harry Bingham – NEW FICTION: BINGHAM
 
Detective Constable Fiona Griffiths is strange.  Not in the regular sense, like everyone is a bit odd.  But rather, Fiona finds solace amongst the dead. She does not pick up on social clues.Yet, when it comes to crime, she is intuitive and resourceful, a crack investigator.
This mystery begins with the discovery of two bodies, a mother and her 6-year old child.  D.C. Griffiths believes the young girl is trying to tell her something which leads her on a complex journey to solve her murder.
A good storyline with an intriguing character study makes this mystery work.
 
Michelle – Administration

MV5BMTM3MzUyNzg3NF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwNjk3NDA4Nw@@._V1_SX214_AL_“People Like Us” – Starring: Michelle Pfeiffer, Michael D’Addario, Chris Pine, Elizabeth Banks, Olivia Wilde – NEW DVDs: PEOPLE LIKE US

This is the story of a man discovering that his recently deceased father had an extended affair that resulted in a daughter. In his quest to learn about his sister, he reevaluates his own life. This movie is a great drama that examines the meaning of family.

 

1676855“Supernatural: Season 7” – Starring: Nicholas Knight, Eric Kripke – NEW DVDs: SUPERNATURAL

I am more than a little biased since Supernatural is one of my favorite shows, but I think it is a must-see. The show has everything: action, adventure, laughs, mild-horror and is, at its heart, the story of two brothers trying to survive. Like all previous seasons, this DVD set has outtakes that are hilarious.

 

Julia – Circulation

downloadThe Fault In Our Stars”–  by John Green – YA: GREEN

Popular YA author, John Green, tells the heart-wrenching, love story of teenagers Hazel and Augustus, who meet for the first time at a cancer support group. Hazel, who is terminally ill, and Augustus, whose cancer is in remission, bond and learn how to live their lives when so much is uncertain.
This book portrays teens with cancer and their families in an honest way — showing their bravery, fear and anger — along with their happier moments.
Although this book is intended for teens, I would also recommend it to adults.

taylor-swift-red-album-400x400“Red” – by Taylor Swift – AUDIO CD: 781.64 SWIFTIn Taylor Swift’s fourth studio album, Red, she leaves her country roots behind for a more “pop” feel with songs like, “22,” “Holy Ground,” and her first single, “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together.” Swift even experiments with dubstep on the track “I Knew You Were Trouble.” Following the same path as her previous albums, Swift’s songs mirror her personal life, as well as her many public romances.

 
This is definitely one of Swift’s best albums to date.
 
Matt – Circulation
 
7743117“Sacré Bleu: A Comedy d’Arte” – By: Christopher Moore – NEW FICTION: MOORE
For those who have not been introduced to Christopher Moore, his 13th book isn’t a bad place to start. Moore’s style of comedy is raunchy, absurd, cheeky, witty and intelligent all at the same time while pushing compelling plots and fleshing out lovable characters. This book is perfect for any lover of 19th Century art as Moore uses famous artists such as Henri Toulouse-Lautrec, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Paul Gauguin, Camille Pissaro, Claude Monet, Édouard Manet, Georges Seurat, James Whistler, Vincent Van Gogh and other Impressionists hanging around 19th Century France as characters. The story revolves around the mysterious death of Van Gogh and its impact on his friends Lucien Lessard, a baker turned artist and his debaucherous companion Henri Toulouse-Letrec as they try to figure out the reasons behind Van Gogh’s mysterious suicide and why the color sacré bleu seems to turn artists insane. An immensely entertaining read and one that includes color photos of many of the pieces of the mentioned artists.
 
13528336“The Onion Book of Known Knowledge” – By: The Onion Writing Staff – NEW NONFICTION: 818.607 ONION
 
This truly is the greatest parody of encyclopedias ever assembled. “The Onion” as a publication has been a staple of Chicago media and a source of solid satire for 24 years. From start to finish this book is incredibly funny provoking all manner of guffaws, giggles, belly laughs, howls, roars, cackling and the occasional snort.
 
Thanks for reading and come back next month for more picks!
 

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